Posted in Genealogy, Jewish Gen, Pearlman

Pearlmans – From Russia to New Jersey to Pennsylvania

Meyer and Anna Pearlman 

Meyer Pearlman is J’s Great Grandfather.  He is the Pearlman immigrant who came over to America from Minsk, Belarus (then Russia) abt 1900.  Things I would like to know about Meyer:

  • Where in Minsk did he come from?
  • Information on his family in Belarus

Here is what I know now of Meyer [Myer, Max].  Myer was born on January 10, 1880 in Minsk Russia to Julius Yuna [Jacob] Pearlman and Ida Woodinski. [1] [2][3][4]I believe he came over between 1898 and 1900 when he was about 20 years old.[5] He was naturalised in 1915. [4]

His sisters and brothers were the following who also came over – Hannah Pearlman Margolin, Sam, Harry, Louis, Charles, Carl and Henry (unconfirmed).

He was married to Anna [Hannah, Annie].  Who also came over between 1897 before Meyer according to the 1910 census or with him in 1898 and was naturalised in 1915 according to the 1920 census.[4] Meyer and Anna married around 1903 – that year he was 23 years old and she was 20.[5] She was 15 years old in 1898 when she arrived, therefore I am making the assumption she came over with her family and was married to Meyer in the USA.[6]

Meyer and Anna had four children:  James Max Pearlman Stacey (1904-1961), Pearl Pearlman Epstein (1906-1994), Sidney Pearlman, J’s Grandfather (1910-1988), and Florence Pearlman Vitale (1917-19884).  Their first 4 children were born in Newark, NJ and Florence was born in Wilkes-Barre, PA.

In 1910, Meyer lived in Newark City, New Jersey where there was a community of 80,000 Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. He was 31 and lived with his wife Anna, 28. He was a laborer working in the Spring Beds industry and his wife stayed home.  They lived with their children Max, 6, Pearl, 4 and Celia, 3 months. They rented a house on Somerset Street. Meyer and Anna’s native tongue was Yiddish but they both spoke English.  Meyer most likely had family or community connections from Minsk in Newark and went there first before moving on to Wilkes-Barre.  It’s possible they attended one of the immigrant synagogues started in the rented quarters and he visited the Young Men’s Hebrew Association at some point. [7]  

meyeranna1910census-newark
1910 Federal Census Newark

By 1914, the Pearlmans moved to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania where they lived until 1942. In 1905 there was around a total population of 1,800 jewish residents  in Wilkes-Barre with 4 synagogues and a number of education and social institutions.[8] In 1914, they lived on 58 North Sherman Street when the Wilkes-Barre Record reported that there was a case of Scarlet Fever in the Pearlman Household.[9]

scarlet-fever-reported-in-house

By 1918, Meyer was living on 241 East Market Street.  He was 39 years old and was working as a Mechanic at Nelson Brothers.  Meyer was 5’4” and had blue eyes and dark hair according to his WWI draft card:[10]

myerpearlmandraft-wwii

In 1920, Meyer and Anna, 42 and 38,  still lived at 241 East Market Street with Max, 15, Pearl, 13, Sidney, 9 and Florence, 2.  They were naturalised citizens at this time.  The children were in school, Anna stayed home and Meyer worked as a Laborer in a Silk Mill.[11] He is also listed in the 1921 Wilkes-Barre City Directory as a grocer and in 1923 as a Laborer. [ 12]

meyeranna1920
1920 Federal Census Wilkes-Barre, PA
1921citydir-mpearlman
1921 Wilkes-Barre City Directory
mpearlmancitydirectory-1923
1923 Wilkes-Barre City Directory

In 1922 it appears that Meyer bought 236 East Market Street which they lived in by 1925 when Meyer was 45 years old and was the Department Superintendent at Nelson Brothers, where his son Sidney, at 14 also worked at that time [13][14]

1925-city-directory
1925 Wilkes-Barre City Directory

legal-dispute-over-property

nelson-brothers

By 1942, Meyer at 62 and Anna at 59 moved to Brooklyn, Kings, New York where their daughter Pearl Epstein lived with her family.  Meyer and Anna lived with Pearl at 567 Monroe Street, Brooklyn the same address that Martin Epstein and his parents (who also immigrated from Minsk)  lived at for over 30 years since about 1925 (according to census records under the Epstein family tree). [15] Meyer passed away in 1951 at 71 and Anna Pearlman died in 1950 at Sixty-seven. They are both buried in Mount Hebron Cemetery in Queen’s New York.[16]

Notes

  1. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [Database online, ancestry.com] – note his WWI card has 15th January 1979
  2. Samson, Robert  Genealogy Research: Meyer Pearlman Genealogy Family Sheet’ Manhasset Hills, New York. 23 August 1992
  3. US Social Security Application. Meyer Pearlman. 10th January 1980
  4. 1920 Federal Census [Database online, ancestry.com]
  5. 1910 Federal Census [Database online, ancestry.com]
  6. The information I have from Robert Samson’s genealogy is that Anna and Family are from ‘Starin, Russia’ – I have not yet done any research on her family
  7. http://www.jewishmag.com/113mag/newark/newark.htm
  8. History of the Jews in Pennsylvania
  9. History of the Jews in Pennsylvania 2
  10. U.S., World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. [online database ancestry.com]
  11. 1920 Federal Census [Online database, ancestry.com]
  12. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 1921 WIlkes Barre, PA; 1923 Wilkes Barre PA (both copied inserts)
  13. Newspapers.com – The Wilkes-Barre Record – 22 Feb 1922, Wed – Page 8
  14. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995: 1925, Wilkes Barre, PA
  15. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 [Database online, ancestry.com] – note his WWI card has 15th January 1979
  16. Meyer Pearlman Find a Grave
  17. Further Information to Confirm: There is another name for a child in the 1910 – Celia who was 3 months old during the 1910 Federal Census completed in April – putting her birth in February 1910 (is this Sidney?
  18. Currently looking for Naturalization Records
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9 thoughts on “Pearlmans – From Russia to New Jersey to Pennsylvania

        1. You wrote a book? Cool! I also like writing the stories to help with my genealogy – it makes you think about what you know and what is still missing and puts it all together. I guess is why we do this – the personal histories are so interesting! Me too – happy to be connected!

          Liked by 1 person

        2. You can check out my book on Amazon and other sites if you like. The title is A Past Worth Telling. It is a poetic memoir. I blog weekly and cover topics in the book from time to time. There are links on this blog site “about the author” and “about the book” which will provide more information. Let me know if you like the book too. Happy researching and blogging! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

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